Black Cinema House Presents: BCH Mixtape: Vol. 1

BCH11_10

Greetings, Chicago!

Friday, November 10th, Black Cinema House is proud to present the BCH Mixtape: Vol. 1, the first in a series of showcases screening independent short films comprising a variety of moving image-makers. Black Cinema House continues its mission to uplift Black cinema, as the BCH Mixtape Series aims to champion an array of works by independent creatives reflecting the breadth of Black perspective and imagination.

 Please join us after the screening for discussion centered on the artists, their featured works, the relevance of short films and themes such as cultural identity, assimilation, generational violence and more!

Stephanie Jeter’s Searching for Isabelle is an ethereal mystery-thriller about a Chicago college student escaping her captor, where the protagonist “discovers a mysterious ability to project herself outside her prison.”

Akwaeke Emezi’s Break Fruit is centered on two Nigerian protagonists in the near-future where, in a city with unbreathable air, deliberate their identity and the love existing between the two. Break Fruit is a story of “exile, homecoming, what gets left behind, and the truths that change everything.”

Troy Pryor’s Intersection addresses Chicago’s gun violence through an intergenerational lens, where an older man dissolves a mugging by connecting with the man who was willing to kill out of desperation.

Ife Olatunji’s Egusi Soup is an ethnographic documentary exploring one Nigerian family’s experience “relocating and acculturating to America.”

Chris Saint Martin’s Carrera is a meditation on anti-Black violence, told as an experimental “barrage of recurring images, audio bites and soundscapes.” 

Shelly Conner’s Quare Life spotlights the life of a 30-something lesbian, who’s recently-failed engagement and unstable work life compels her to seek grounding from friends, family and a problematic mother.

Terrance Thompson’s Drive Slow centers a Black high school senior of Chicago’s south side struggling to write his college essay when confronted with the question of “how his environment influences his worldview.”